Soviet Poster Art

Liljevalchs’ major autumn exhibition is an in-depth study of the Soviet Union of the 1920s. We will be presenting film and propaganda posters from a unique Japanese collection, produced during the brutal regimes of Lenin and Stalin by some of the foremost Soviet artists.

 

The 1920s was a golden era for Russian art, not least graphic art. The Russian avant-garde flourished, putting their mark on society and inspiring artists throughout the world. Film posters was the main genre of 1920s Soviet poster art and the major names are Vladimir and Georgii Stenberg, whose father was a Swedish decorative painter who arrived in Russia at the end of the 19th century and married a Latvian woman.

The majority of the artists represented in the exhibition were not primarily poster makers, but rather poets, painters or photographers. However, poster art was the medium above all others during the first decade of the Soviet Union and attracted major contemporary artists. The Stenberg brothers also worked with other artistic genres, mainly theatre stage design, but it was with poster art that they made a name for themselves. From 1924 and onwards, they produced some 300 film posters, characterised by an innovative idiom that differentiated itself from that of their international colleagues.

At the turn of the 21st century, Swedish documentary filmmaker Michael Stenberg became involved in an attempt to trace the father of the Stenberg brothers who had abandoned his family and returned to Sweden. In connection with his research, Michael Stenberg learned that many of the original Stenberg brothers’ posters were located in Japan, in the collection of the graphic and fashion designer and inveterate collector Ruki Matsumoto. Some years later he met Matsumoto whose gigantic collection comprised 20,000 posters.

Unfortunately, Ruki Matsumoto suffered a stroke and passed away before a project to make a documentary film about him and his collection got off the ground. One of Matsumoto’s last wishes was that his collection should remain intact and be displayed for art and graphic enthusiasts throughout the world. The exhibition at Liljevalchs is a contribution in realising his desire.

The exhibition is largely devoted to expressive film posters from the 1920s, by the Stenberg brothers and other masters of the genre. One gallery is dedicated to El Lissitzky, one of the major graphic artists of the time. In two smaller galleries propaganda posters with texts by Vladimir Mayakovsky are on display. Stage designers Ulla Kassius and Moa Möller have transformed Gallery 1 into an elegant cinema where visitors can sit comfortably in the armchairs and watch Dziga Vertov’s Man with a Movie Camera, a technically advanced 1929 avant-garde film that will be screened nonstop accompanied by newly-composed music by the British band In the Nursery.

In conjunction with the exhibition, a series of seminars discussing and highlighting subjects such as cinema in the interests of politics, the intense artistic enthusiasm during the time of the revolution and the possible connection between agitprop and today’s troll factories.

In addition, Cinemateket will screen ten silent films from the 1920s by major Soviet directors, including Sergei Eisenstein and Dziga Vertov. Accompanied by live music, the films will be screened in the Bio Victor cinema at Filmhuset, Stockholm. The series commences on 1 November.

12 oktober 20186 januari 2019

Soviet Poster Art

Liljevalchs’ major autumn exhibition is an in-depth study of the Soviet Union of the 1920s. We will be presenting film and propaganda posters from a unique Japanese collection, produced during the brutal regimes of Lenin and Stalin by some of the foremost Soviet artists.

 

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Soviet Poster Art

Lars Lerin

Welcome to Lars Lerin’s pictorial world, created from water and pigment. This summer, Liljevalchs will display hundreds of paintings from Lerin’s 2002–2018 period. The rugged landscape of Lofoten or the ruins of Syria, a pillar-like birch forest or lines of files on archive shelves – Lerin reincarnates powerful visual impressions via his inimitable technique.

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Lars Lerin

Petra Gipp: Plaster Models and Book Launch

For architect Petra Gipp, working with models is key. The models allow her sculptural design idiom to take form in the space – or in the void – with a personal voice. At Liljevalchs, Gipp will present 34 plaster models, which are also depicted in a publication that will be launched in conjunction with the opening of the exhibition.

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Petra Gipp: Plaster Models and Book Launch

The Spring Salon 2018

The Liljevalchs Spring Salon is a proud tradition dating from 1921. Following extensive renovations to our building, the Spring Salon will once again be presented at Djurgården. And while the floors may be new and the walls freshly painted most things remain the same in this classic event.

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The Spring Salon 2018

LYUBOV – Love in Russian

After almost two years of renovations, Liljevalchs celebrates its return to Djurgården with three exhibitions, including the world premiere of Staffan Julén’s and Nobel Prize winner Svetlana Alexievich’s film on Russian love.

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LYUBOV – Love in Russian

Traces of an Ongoing Memory

For more than a year, a video camera at the top of the Katarina Lift has documented all movement in the area surrounding Slussen in central Stockholm. The images for Mikael Lundberg and Mats Nordahl’s exhibition were created from 8,760 hours of film footage.

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Traces of an Ongoing Memory

Portraits of Politicians and Celebrities

At the 2017 Spring Salon, Camilla Holmqvist contributed five drawings of a very singular expression, depicting politicians and celebrities. Now she returns to Liljevalchs with a larger series of portraits.

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Portraits of Politicians and Celebrities

Focus on Finland – 3 x Aho & Soldan

Liljevalchs’ summer exhibition presents Finnish photography from the 1920s to the 1960s, featuring three pioneers of photography and documentary film from the same cultural family: Heikki Aho, Björn Soldan and Heikki’s daughter Claire Aho.

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Focus on Finland – 3 x Aho & Soldan

The Spring Salon 2017

The Liljevalchs Spring Salon is a proud tradition dating from 1921. As the renovation of our building in Djurgården continues, the Spring Salon will stay in the city centre. Opening day is 11 January 2017.


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The Spring Salon 2017

Death – An Exhibition about Life

Can the memory of our dead be integrated into our public spaces? Can the cemetery become more attractive and inspiring? This is the theme of a summer exhibition in Galärvarvsparken on Djurgården.

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Death – An Exhibition about Life

Liljevalchs opening hours

During the Lars Lerin exhibition:
Monday–Thursday 10:00 am–6:00 pm, Friday to Sunday 11:00 am–5:00 pm. 

Entrance fee: SEK 80, free entry for under 18s. Free entry for all on Mondays.

Getting here

Djurgårdsvägen 60.

Getting here:
Djurgården ferries from Slussen or Skeppsholmen, tram no 7, bus no 67. 

Parking
Falkenbergsgatan, just behind Liljevalchs